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8 Hotel Marketing Trends For 2018

8 Hotel Marketing Trends For 2018
It’s that time of year again and business planning is in full swing

Ten Hotel Trends For 2018: Independents Lead The Way

Ten Hotel Trends For 2018: Independents Lead The Way
New trends are emerging as hotels seek to reinvent themselves in the face of inroads from Airbnb, millennial travel patterns and other forces

These Will Be The Top Dining Trends Of 2018

These Will Be The Top Dining Trends Of 2018
Tom Colicchio, Katie Button, Eric Ripert, Gail Simmons and more —to share their predictions for next year

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) For Hotels?

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) For Hotels?
In this article, we’ll look at restaurant SEO, and how you can position your restaurant’s website for the greatest success.

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Cranachan (Scottish Whipped Cream With Whisky, Raspberries, and Toasted Oats) Recipe

Cranachan (Scottish Whipped Cream With Whisky, Raspberries, and Toasted Oats) Recipe

Cranachan is the classic Scottish dessert of Scotch-spiked whipped cream layered with raspberries and toasted oats and sweetened with honey. It's as easy as it is delicious.

Cranachan

Directions
1.Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C). In a medium bowl, combine cream with oats and let soak 20 minutes.

2.Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, crush 8 ounces of the raspberries with a spoon to make a pulpy puree. Stir in lemon juice. Set remaining 4 ounces whole raspberries aside.

3.Using a fine-mesh strainer, strain oats, collecting the cream in a bowl; use a spoon or rubber spatula to press out as much cream as possible. Set cream aside.

4.In a small oven-safe skillet or on an aluminum baking sheet, stir soaked oats with melted butter and toast in oven, tossing and stirring frequently, until deeply browned, about 20 minutes (you want the oats to darken nearly to the point of being burnt, but don't actually burn them).

5.Strain oats on paper towels, and sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt.

6.For a More Dense, Mousse-Like Cream: In a food processor, combine reserved cream with mascarpone (if using), Scotch, and honey, along with a pinch of salt. Process until a dense whipped cream forms.

7.For a More Standard, Lighter Whipped Cream: In a stand mixer fitter with the whisk, or using electric beaters or a hand whisk, combine reserved cream with mascarpone (if using), Scotch, and honey, along with a pinch of salt. Beat until a stiff whipped cream forms.

8.To Assemble: In individual serving glasses, spread an even layer of whipped cream. Top with a layer of the raspberry purée. Sprinkle some toasted oats on top, then add one more layer of the whipped cream to fill (or nearly fill) the glasses. Garnish each with the reserved whole raspberries, sprinkle additional toasted oats on top, and drizzle with honey. Serve.

Ingredients
2 cups (475ml) heavy cream
1/4 cup rolled (30g) or steel-cut (45g) oats (see note)
12 ounces (340g) fresh raspberries, divided
1 teaspoon (5ml) fresh juice from 1 lemon
1 tablespoon (15g) unsalted butter, melted
Kosher salt
2 tablespoons (30g) mascarpone cheese (optional)
3 tablespoons (45ml) Scotch whisky (see note)
2 tablespoons (30ml) honey, plus more for drizzling

FROM SERIOUS EATS
Cranachan is the classic Scottish dessert of Scotch-spiked whipped cream layered with raspberries and toasted oats and sweetened with honey. It's as easy as it is delicious.

Cranachan

Directions
1.Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C). In a medium bowl, combine cream with oats and let soak 20 minutes.

2.Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, crush 8 ounces of the raspberries with a spoon to make a pulpy puree. Stir in lemon juice. Set remaining 4 ounces whole raspberries aside.

3.Using a fine-mesh strainer, strain oats, collecting the cream in a bowl; use a spoon or rubber spatula to press out as much cream as possible. Set cream aside.

4.In a small oven-safe skillet or on an aluminum baking sheet, stir soaked oats with melted butter and toast in oven, tossing and stirring frequently, until deeply browned, about 20 minutes (you want the oats to darken nearly to the point of being burnt, but don't actually burn them).

5.Strain oats on paper towels, and sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt.

6.For a More Dense, Mousse-Like Cream: In a food processor, combine reserved cream with mascarpone (if using), Scotch, and honey, along with a pinch of salt. Process until a dense whipped cream forms.

7.For a More Standard, Lighter Whipped Cream: In a stand mixer fitter with the whisk, or using electric beaters or a hand whisk, combine reserved cream with mascarpone (if using), Scotch, and honey, along with a pinch of salt. Beat until a stiff whipped cream forms.

8.To Assemble: In individual serving glasses, spread an even layer of whipped cream. Top with a layer of the raspberry purée. Sprinkle some toasted oats on top, then add one more layer of the whipped cream to fill (or nearly fill) the glasses. Garnish each with the reserved whole raspberries, sprinkle additional toasted oats on top, and drizzle with honey. Serve.

Ingredients
2 cups (475ml) heavy cream
1/4 cup rolled (30g) or steel-cut (45g) oats (see note)
12 ounces (340g) fresh raspberries, divided
1 teaspoon (5ml) fresh juice from 1 lemon
1 tablespoon (15g) unsalted butter, melted
Kosher salt
2 tablespoons (30g) mascarpone cheese (optional)
3 tablespoons (45ml) Scotch whisky (see note)
2 tablespoons (30ml) honey, plus more for drizzling

FROM SERIOUS EATS

Coffee and Climate Change: Snow in the Sahara and Heavy Rains in Costa Rica

Coffee and Climate Change: Snow in the Sahara and Heavy Rains in Costa Rica

Ιt is mid-January and it's snowing in the Sahara, but there is still no sight of snow in Helsinki. Meanwhile, in Costa Rica, it's supposed to be dry season and summer at its best, but in recent days the country has been hit by heavy rains and cold winds. Rainfall has caused the coffee trees to bloom for several months too early, which has a negative effect on the coming crop.

paulig-coffee

Elisa Markula, Managing Director of the Coffee Division, wrote earlier in her blog (in Finnish) about the challenges of climate change and the unexpected weather patterns that coffee farmers encounter. Higher temperatures, prolonged rains, increased drought and stronger winds, to name a few, are the challenges that producers are increasingly encountering. Changed weather phenomena are not always caused by climate change, but contribute, for example to the spreading of plant diseases, complicating the processing of coffee or causing erosion on coffee farms.

Can a coffee farmer adapt to climate change?

It is possible to adapt to the changing climate and the challenges it poses to some extent. Good farming practices, meaning day-to-day working practices in the coffee farm, are key to this. Healthy coffee trees have better resistance to various diseases – just like people do too. Shade trees allow you to control the temperature in the farm and the amount of light that the trees receive. Rainwater can be redirected by channels and ditches away from the trees that get excessive amounts of water. Multi-layered vegetation can bind water to the soil from which it is filtered and released at a slower rate.

Most Arabica varieties are very sensitive to both pests and plant diseases. One way to adapt to climate change is to develop and plant new, more resistant coffee varieties.

costa-rica-coffee


Decades of research behind new coffee varieties 

The National Coffee Institute of Costa Rica, ICAFE, released a new coffee variety, Catiguá, to Costa Rican farmers in December. Catiguá was developed in Brazil as early as 1980 when two varieties of coffee, Catuaí, and a leaf rust resistant Timor hybrid, were crossed. The new variety is the result of 24 years of development: every year, only the best coffee seedlings are selected in order to produce genetically homogeneous and stable variety. In 2009, the Costa Rican Coffee Institute started testing Catiguá with 18 other varieties, and the Catiguá stood up, particularly because of its productivity, cup quality and resistance. Now, 8 years later, the variety is available to farmers in the country.

Choosing a coffee variety is an important decision for a farmer: the recommended life cycle of a coffee tree is 20-30 years, so a wrong variety selection has far-reaching effects. Planting new seedlings is also expensive. In addition to the price of seedlings, planting requires a lot of work and the new coffee trees produce the first cherries only after 2-3 years. It's also important to remember that all varieties of coffee require the same work: fertilisation, cutting, controlling the amount of light. The farmer is not safe from the effects of climate change only by changing the coffee variety. Paulig's partnership programs provide farmers with pragmatic support for choosing of farming practices and coffee varieties best suited to each farm, taking into account the profitability of farming. The bright future of coffee is indeed built together.


Ιt is mid-January and it's snowing in the Sahara, but there is still no sight of snow in Helsinki. Meanwhile, in Costa Rica, it's supposed to be dry season and summer at its best, but in recent days the country has been hit by heavy rains and cold winds. Rainfall has caused the coffee trees to bloom for several months too early, which has a negative effect on the coming crop.

paulig-coffee

Elisa Markula, Managing Director of the Coffee Division, wrote earlier in her blog (in Finnish) about the challenges of climate change and the unexpected weather patterns that coffee farmers encounter. Higher temperatures, prolonged rains, increased drought and stronger winds, to name a few, are the challenges that producers are increasingly encountering. Changed weather phenomena are not always caused by climate change, but contribute, for example to the spreading of plant diseases, complicating the processing of coffee or causing erosion on coffee farms.

Can a coffee farmer adapt to climate change?

It is possible to adapt to the changing climate and the challenges it poses to some extent. Good farming practices, meaning day-to-day working practices in the coffee farm, are key to this. Healthy coffee trees have better resistance to various diseases – just like people do too. Shade trees allow you to control the temperature in the farm and the amount of light that the trees receive. Rainwater can be redirected by channels and ditches away from the trees that get excessive amounts of water. Multi-layered vegetation can bind water to the soil from which it is filtered and released at a slower rate.

Most Arabica varieties are very sensitive to both pests and plant diseases. One way to adapt to climate change is to develop and plant new, more resistant coffee varieties.

costa-rica-coffee


Decades of research behind new coffee varieties 

The National Coffee Institute of Costa Rica, ICAFE, released a new coffee variety, Catiguá, to Costa Rican farmers in December. Catiguá was developed in Brazil as early as 1980 when two varieties of coffee, Catuaí, and a leaf rust resistant Timor hybrid, were crossed. The new variety is the result of 24 years of development: every year, only the best coffee seedlings are selected in order to produce genetically homogeneous and stable variety. In 2009, the Costa Rican Coffee Institute started testing Catiguá with 18 other varieties, and the Catiguá stood up, particularly because of its productivity, cup quality and resistance. Now, 8 years later, the variety is available to farmers in the country.

Choosing a coffee variety is an important decision for a farmer: the recommended life cycle of a coffee tree is 20-30 years, so a wrong variety selection has far-reaching effects. Planting new seedlings is also expensive. In addition to the price of seedlings, planting requires a lot of work and the new coffee trees produce the first cherries only after 2-3 years. It's also important to remember that all varieties of coffee require the same work: fertilisation, cutting, controlling the amount of light. The farmer is not safe from the effects of climate change only by changing the coffee variety. Paulig's partnership programs provide farmers with pragmatic support for choosing of farming practices and coffee varieties best suited to each farm, taking into account the profitability of farming. The bright future of coffee is indeed built together.


Questions that you might want to ask

Questions that you might want to ask


IS IT O.K. TO SEND MY COCKTAIL BACK IF IT ISN’T STRONG ENOUGH?
Not unless you want to look like a real tool. As we’ve written before, people who say they want a “strong”-tasting cocktail usually just mean they want to taste the booze. If that’s your jam, just order your spirits straight. A cocktail is at its best when all the flavors are in harmony, not when all you can taste is one dominant spirit.

Now, some of you are still going to order your cocktails and request that they’re “strong.” Most bartenders have a trick for people like you. Many either float a bit of pure spirit on the top of your drink or even dip your straw in liquor before serving the drink to you. That way, your brain thinks the drink is “strong” because the first flavor you encounter is pure spirit, but it really isn’t.

IS IT O.K. TO COMPLAIN IF THE SERVER DOESN’T LET ME TASTE MY WINE BEFORE HE/SHE POURS IT?
Absolutely. If you are buying a bottle of wine and the server opens it and pours without giving you the opportunity to taste, it’s a big no-no. But it’s also important that you understand why you’re supposed to taste before you throw a fit: You taste to ensure the wine is not flawed, not to determine whether or not you like it. You would never return the steak or pasta you ordered simply because you decided you didn’t like it— well, unless you are that person. You’d only return it if something was wrong with it. The same is true for wine. If it has a flaw, you should absolutely send it back. And the only way you know is if you taste it before your full glass is poured.

CAN I DRINK CRAFT BEER FROM A CAN OR SHOULD I BE POURING IT IN A GLASS?
I used to hear people claim it was uncouth to drink beer from a can, but I say drink your beer however you want. There are so many great craft beers in cans nowadays; if you feel like enjoying it straight from the source, there is no reason why you shouldn’t.

That said, there are a lot of advantages you can get from pouring your canned beer into a glass, especially the right glass. You’ll smell more of the beer’s aromas, pick up more of the flavors, and look classy AF doing it. But at the end of the day, you do you. Drink the beer how you want to drink it. Just please don’t shotgun it.

IS IT O.K. TO SEND MY COCKTAIL BACK IF IT ISN’T STRONG ENOUGH?
Not unless you want to look like a real tool. As we’ve written before, people who say they want a “strong”-tasting cocktail usually just mean they want to taste the booze. If that’s your jam, just order your spirits straight. A cocktail is at its best when all the flavors are in harmony, not when all you can taste is one dominant spirit.

Now, some of you are still going to order your cocktails and request that they’re “strong.” Most bartenders have a trick for people like you. Many either float a bit of pure spirit on the top of your drink or even dip your straw in liquor before serving the drink to you. That way, your brain thinks the drink is “strong” because the first flavor you encounter is pure spirit, but it really isn’t.

IS IT O.K. TO COMPLAIN IF THE SERVER DOESN’T LET ME TASTE MY WINE BEFORE HE/SHE POURS IT?
Absolutely. If you are buying a bottle of wine and the server opens it and pours without giving you the opportunity to taste, it’s a big no-no. But it’s also important that you understand why you’re supposed to taste before you throw a fit: You taste to ensure the wine is not flawed, not to determine whether or not you like it. You would never return the steak or pasta you ordered simply because you decided you didn’t like it— well, unless you are that person. You’d only return it if something was wrong with it. The same is true for wine. If it has a flaw, you should absolutely send it back. And the only way you know is if you taste it before your full glass is poured.

CAN I DRINK CRAFT BEER FROM A CAN OR SHOULD I BE POURING IT IN A GLASS?
I used to hear people claim it was uncouth to drink beer from a can, but I say drink your beer however you want. There are so many great craft beers in cans nowadays; if you feel like enjoying it straight from the source, there is no reason why you shouldn’t.

That said, there are a lot of advantages you can get from pouring your canned beer into a glass, especially the right glass. You’ll smell more of the beer’s aromas, pick up more of the flavors, and look classy AF doing it. But at the end of the day, you do you. Drink the beer how you want to drink it. Just please don’t shotgun it.

Why black wine is getting viral

Why black wine is getting viral

Given the proliferation of visually driven food and drink trends (rainbow bagels! unicorn Frappucinos!), one would be forgiven for thinking black wine is a new phenomenon, created for and by the Instagram age. But these inky wines are actually some of the world’s oldest juice, made from an ancient, deeply pigmented red grape.


blackwine

The Saperavi grape (its name translates to “dye”) is indigenous to the country Georgia, with archeological accounts dating back to 5000 B.C.E. It produces near-black wines that are almost unheard of outside Europe. Older generations of Georgians sometimes refer to Saperavi wines as shavi, or black. One of 525 indigenous grapes in Georgia, Saperavi is among the oldest varietals in existence. It hails from Kakheti, Georgia’s easternmost region on the Russian border.

Saperavi is now Georgia’s most popular wine and is becoming increasingly available internationally. A few wineries in the United States, Eastern Europe, and Australia are growing it and producing their own bottles.

Chuck Zaleski, winemaker at Fero Vineyards and Winery, makes Saperavi in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. “It always sells out,” he says. (He’s not exaggerating; according to Fero’s website, at press time its Saperavi is unavailable through February 18.)

Saperavi is approachable and relatable, like a Shiraz, says Kate Gersamia, owner of Georgia’s Lukasi Winery. The tastes echo blackberries, dark fruits, beet, spice, vanilla, and toasty flavors, with a smooth texture and ample acidity. It’s an excellent food wine as well; black wines pair well with fatty meats, fried vegetables, walnuts (widely used in Georgian cuisine), and cheeses. Zaleski finds it has a broader range for rich foods than many other red wines, due to its acidity.

This wine has historically been made in buried clay vessels, but some modern-day winemakers like Gersamia produce it in stainless steel tanks and then age it in barrels. Georgians tend to drink the wine as close to bottling time as possible, but contemporary processes allow for elegant Saperavi wines that can be drunk 10 to 20 years after bottling, Gersamia says.

Like many Georgian wines, Saperavi wines are single-variety, or not blended with other grapes. The results are distinctive. “A sommelier who has never tried Saperavi will easily distinguish it from other wines because of its strong varietal aromas, which are unique [to the grape],” Natia Metreveli, CEO of Vaziani Winery, says.

One surprising place to find black Saperavi wines in the United States is New York’s Finger Lakes region. Dr. Konstantin Frank, founder of the Dr. Konstantin Frank Winery, brought the first Saperavi cuttings to America in 1958. (In fact, Zaleski’s vines came from plants that were brought over from Eastern Europe by Frank more than 50 years ago.)

Until 2013, Saperavi was not a recognized variety according to the U.S. government, so Dr. Frank’s winery labeled it under a proprietary name (which it has now changed to the grape name). Frank’s Saperavi (grown on its Keuka Lake site) is very spicy, with a fragrant, almost “Christmas cake” aroma with notes of cinnamon, clove, and dried herbs. If that description isn’t enough to make you want to get your hands on a bottle, well, maybe the prospect of snapping an Instagram-worthy pic might be.

SEEN ON VINEPAIR.COM
Given the proliferation of visually driven food and drink trends (rainbow bagels! unicorn Frappucinos!), one would be forgiven for thinking black wine is a new phenomenon, created for and by the Instagram age. But these inky wines are actually some of the world’s oldest juice, made from an ancient, deeply pigmented red grape.


blackwine

The Saperavi grape (its name translates to “dye”) is indigenous to the country Georgia, with archeological accounts dating back to 5000 B.C.E. It produces near-black wines that are almost unheard of outside Europe. Older generations of Georgians sometimes refer to Saperavi wines as shavi, or black. One of 525 indigenous grapes in Georgia, Saperavi is among the oldest varietals in existence. It hails from Kakheti, Georgia’s easternmost region on the Russian border.

Saperavi is now Georgia’s most popular wine and is becoming increasingly available internationally. A few wineries in the United States, Eastern Europe, and Australia are growing it and producing their own bottles.

Chuck Zaleski, winemaker at Fero Vineyards and Winery, makes Saperavi in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. “It always sells out,” he says. (He’s not exaggerating; according to Fero’s website, at press time its Saperavi is unavailable through February 18.)

Saperavi is approachable and relatable, like a Shiraz, says Kate Gersamia, owner of Georgia’s Lukasi Winery. The tastes echo blackberries, dark fruits, beet, spice, vanilla, and toasty flavors, with a smooth texture and ample acidity. It’s an excellent food wine as well; black wines pair well with fatty meats, fried vegetables, walnuts (widely used in Georgian cuisine), and cheeses. Zaleski finds it has a broader range for rich foods than many other red wines, due to its acidity.

This wine has historically been made in buried clay vessels, but some modern-day winemakers like Gersamia produce it in stainless steel tanks and then age it in barrels. Georgians tend to drink the wine as close to bottling time as possible, but contemporary processes allow for elegant Saperavi wines that can be drunk 10 to 20 years after bottling, Gersamia says.

Like many Georgian wines, Saperavi wines are single-variety, or not blended with other grapes. The results are distinctive. “A sommelier who has never tried Saperavi will easily distinguish it from other wines because of its strong varietal aromas, which are unique [to the grape],” Natia Metreveli, CEO of Vaziani Winery, says.

One surprising place to find black Saperavi wines in the United States is New York’s Finger Lakes region. Dr. Konstantin Frank, founder of the Dr. Konstantin Frank Winery, brought the first Saperavi cuttings to America in 1958. (In fact, Zaleski’s vines came from plants that were brought over from Eastern Europe by Frank more than 50 years ago.)

Until 2013, Saperavi was not a recognized variety according to the U.S. government, so Dr. Frank’s winery labeled it under a proprietary name (which it has now changed to the grape name). Frank’s Saperavi (grown on its Keuka Lake site) is very spicy, with a fragrant, almost “Christmas cake” aroma with notes of cinnamon, clove, and dried herbs. If that description isn’t enough to make you want to get your hands on a bottle, well, maybe the prospect of snapping an Instagram-worthy pic might be.

SEEN ON VINEPAIR.COM


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